The High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN), a University of California San Diego partnership project led by the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, supports Internet-data applications in the research, education, and public safety realms.

HPWREN functions as a collaborative, Internet-connected cyberinfrastructure. The project supports a high-bandwidth wireless backbone and access data network in San Diego, Riverside, and Imperial counties in areas that are typically not well-served by other technologies to reach the Internet. This includes backbone locations, typically sited on mountain tops, to connect often hard-to-reach areas in the remote Southern California back country.

San Diego State University's Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve after heavy rains seen from one of the HPWREN web cameras on 2/27/2017.

The network supports a wide range of network application requirements, ranging from the high-volume astronomical data generated by the Palomar Observatory, to a steady output of continuous, low-volume traffic from many devices such as earthquake and other environment-observing sensors, which deliver real-time data. HPWREN includes permanent sites as well as those created temporarily and on short notice, such as firefighter Incident Command Posts (ICPs). HPWREN saw use in several of the major wild fires to hit San Diego County across many years.

The network spans from San Clemente Island in the Pacific Ocean, via the southern California coast to the inland valleys, east toward the mountain elevations of almost 9,000 feet, and the remote desert, reaching almost to the Arizona border. The network's longest link is 72 miles in distance, from the San Diego Supercomputer Center to San Clemente Island.

State of HPWREN Past, Present and Future

December 26, 2016

The network currently covers most of San Diego and much of Imperial Counties and has extensions into Riverside County. It has wireless backbone speeds up to 200+ megabits per second on point-to-point radio based connections between mountain peaks. From those peaks it can extend wireless network access down into the lower elevations via directional or sector antennas, sometimes additionally using intermediate radio relays.

HPWREN is active and continues to expand and evolve. Services the community have been used to are increasing, such as more supported devices, sensors and cameras. Those services are being extended via the HPWREN network into neighboring counties. HPWREN data and services are being replicated across regions to make them more available in the event of emergencies and to improve their access. To read the whole article, click here.

HPWREN Live Stream

Fires, weather conditions, flooding, and other public safety conditions are scenarios where real-time sensor data distributions can become important aspects for situational awareness. HPWREN can now provide live feeds from most of its cameras, in addition to the post-processed videos shown at https://www.youtube.com/user/hpwren/videos. The recording on the left, originally provided live, shows the Santa Margarita River in the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve, a San Diego State University field station, during or after heavy rain falls. Such an increase can lead to flash flooding within minutes, easily creating life threatening situations to anyone caught in it.

HPWREN Live Stream - SMER river flooding February 27, 2017

Web Cameras on Santa Ynez Peak

360 degree panorama